Chromosome-level genome assembly of Murraya paniculata sheds light on biosynthesis of floral volatiles.

Publication Overview
TitleChromosome-level genome assembly of Murraya paniculata sheds light on biosynthesis of floral volatiles.
AuthorsYang T, Yin X, Kang H, Yang D, Yang X, Yang Y, Yang Y
TypeJournal Article
Journal NameBMC biology
Volume21
Issue1
Year2023
Page(s)142
CitationYang T, Yin X, Kang H, Yang D, Yang X, Yang Y, Yang Y. Chromosome-level genome assembly of Murraya paniculata sheds light on biosynthesis of floral volatiles.. BMC biology. 2023 Jun 20; 21(1):142.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Murraya paniculata (L.) Jack, commonly called orange jessamine in the family Rutaceae, is an important ornamental plant in tropical and subtropical regions which is famous for its strong fragrance. Although genome assemblies have been reported for many Rutaceae species, mainly in the genus Citrus, full genomic information has not been reported for M. paniculata, which is a prerequisite for in-depth genetic studies on Murraya and manipulation using genetic engineering techniques. Here, we report a high-quality chromosome-level genome assembly of M. paniculata and aim to provide insights on the molecular mechanisms of flower volatile biosynthesis.

RESULTS
The genome assembly with a contig N50 of 18.25 Mb consists of 9 pseudomolecules and has a total length of 216.86 Mb. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that M. paniculata diverged from the common ancestor approximately 25 million years ago and has not undergone any species-specific whole genome duplication events. Genome structural annotation and comparative genomics analysis revealed that there are obvious differences in transposon contents among the genomes of M. paniculata and Citrus species, especially in the upstream regions of genes. Research on the flower volatiles of M. paniculata and C. maxima at three flowering stages revealed significant differences in volatile composition with the flowers of C. maxima lacking benzaldehyde and phenylacetaldehyde. Notably, there are transposons inserted in the upstream region of the phenylacetaldehyde synthase (PAAS) genes Cg1g029630 and Cg1g029640 in C. maxima, but not in the upstream region of three PAAS genes Me2G_2379, Me2G_2381, and Me2G_2382 in M. paniculata. Our results indicated that compared to the low expression levels of PAAS genes in C. maxima, the higher expression levels of the three PAAS genes in M. paniculata are the main factor affecting the phenylacetaldehyde biosynthesis and causing the content difference of phenylacetaldehyde. The phenylacetaldehyde synthetic activities of the enzymes encoded by M. paniculata PAAS genes were validated by in vitro analyses.

CONCLUSIONS
Our study provides useful genomic resources of M. paniculata for further research on Rutaceae plants, identifies new PAAS genes, and provides insights into how transposons contribute to variations in flower volatiles among Murraya and Citrus plants.

Properties
Additional details for this publication include:
Property NameValue
Journal CountryEngland
Elocation10.1186/s12915-023-01639-6
Publication ModelElectronic
ISSN1741-7007
eISSN1741-7007
Publication Date2023 Jun 20
Journal AbbreviationBMC Biol
PII142
DOI10.1186/s12915-023-01639-6
LanguageEnglish
Language Abbreng
Publication TypeJournal Article
Copyright© 2023. The Author(s).
Publication TypeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't